my all expansive nothing
flickr:

Indigenous People’s Day, a gallery on Flickr.
Indigenous groups around the world, many of whom are becoming less and less prominent by the day, are rich with culture and traditions. We created this gallery to share a small glimpse into some portraits of these often overlooked communities in North America and across the globe. This gallery is inspired by Indigenous People’s Day (Oct. 13) on Yahoo News. Please share some of your favorite portraits of diverse cultures and people from around the world in this gallery.
Photos by mlangsam2004.

flickr:

Indigenous People’s Day, a gallery on Flickr.

Indigenous groups around the world, many of whom are becoming less and less prominent by the day, are rich with culture and traditions. We created this gallery to share a small glimpse into some portraits of these often overlooked communities in North America and across the globe.

This gallery is inspired by Indigenous People’s Day (Oct. 13) on Yahoo News.

Please share some of your favorite portraits of diverse cultures and people from around the world in this gallery.

Photos by mlangsam2004.

ucresearch:

Why are human faces so unique?
What’s in a face? The amazing variety of human faces — far greater than that of most other animals — is the result of evolutionary pressure to make each of us unique and easily recognizable, according to a new study out of UC Berkeley.
Behavioral ecologist Michael J. Sheehan explains that our highly visual social interactions are almost certainly the driver of this evolutionary trend. Many animals use smell or vocalization to identify individuals, making distinctive facial features unimportant, especially for animals that roam after dark, he said. But humans are different.
In the study, Sheehan and coauthor Michael Nachman asked, “Are traits such as distance between the eyes or width of the nose variable just by chance, or has there been evolutionary selection to be more variable than they would be otherwise; more distinctive and more unique?”
As predicted, the researchers found that facial traits are much more variable than other bodily traits, such as the length of the hand, and that facial traits are independent of other facial traits, unlike most body measures. People with longer arms, for example, typically have longer legs, while people with wider noses or widely spaced eyes don’t have longer noses. Both findings suggest that facial variation has been enhanced through evolution.
“Genetic variation tends to be weeded out by natural selection in the case of traits that are essential to survival,” Nachman said. “Here it is the opposite; selection is maintaining variation. All of this is consistent with the idea that there has been selection for variation to facilitate recognition of individuals.”
Human faces are so variable because we evolved to look unique →

This gif is hard to ignore

ucresearch:

Why are human faces so unique?


What’s in a face? The amazing variety of human faces — far greater than that of most other animals — is the result of evolutionary pressure to make each of us unique and easily recognizable, according to a new study out of UC Berkeley.

Behavioral ecologist Michael J. Sheehan explains that our highly visual social interactions are almost certainly the driver of this evolutionary trend. Many animals use smell or vocalization to identify individuals, making distinctive facial features unimportant, especially for animals that roam after dark, he said. But humans are different.

In the study, Sheehan and coauthor Michael Nachman asked, “Are traits such as distance between the eyes or width of the nose variable just by chance, or has there been evolutionary selection to be more variable than they would be otherwise; more distinctive and more unique?”

As predicted, the researchers found that facial traits are much more variable than other bodily traits, such as the length of the hand, and that facial traits are independent of other facial traits, unlike most body measures. People with longer arms, for example, typically have longer legs, while people with wider noses or widely spaced eyes don’t have longer noses. Both findings suggest that facial variation has been enhanced through evolution.

“Genetic variation tends to be weeded out by natural selection in the case of traits that are essential to survival,” Nachman said. “Here it is the opposite; selection is maintaining variation. All of this is consistent with the idea that there has been selection for variation to facilitate recognition of individuals.”

Human faces are so variable because we evolved to look unique

This gif is hard to ignore

Want

balldontlie:

Kevin Durant uses LeBron James when he plays ‘NBA 2K15,’ not himself

He’s maxed out… What do you expect

balldontlie:

Kevin Durant uses LeBron James when he plays ‘NBA 2K15,’ not himself

He’s maxed out… What do you expect

digg:

This is what getting a tattoo looks like in slow motion. (Full video)

digg:

This is what getting a tattoo looks like in slow motion. (Full video)

Kobe like damn

thisistheverge:

Nintendo introduces new 3DS and 3DS XL handhelds
Nintendo is finally adding a second analog stick to its handhelds as part of a major refresh to the 3DS line. The company already sells the Circle Pad Pro add-on to allow for dual analog control of games like Monster Hunter, but until now has not offered an all-in-one option for gamers.

Want

thisistheverge:

Nintendo introduces new 3DS and 3DS XL handhelds
Nintendo is finally adding a second analog stick to its handhelds as part of a major refresh to the 3DS line. The company already sells the Circle Pad Pro add-on to allow for dual analog control of games like Monster Hunter, but until now has not offered an all-in-one option for gamers.

Want

My old setup… When I was skinnier lol 😢 #brideseats #personal #steeringwheel #takata #racemode #racekor #kamispeed

My old setup… When I was skinnier lol 😢 #brideseats #personal #steeringwheel #takata #racemode #racekor #kamispeed

THURSDAY MOURNING THE LOSS OF WEDNESDAY.

Clever

fastcompany:

Watch Two Good Samaritans Rescue A Fat Prairie Dog

fastcompany:

Watch Two Good Samaritans Rescue A Fat Prairie Dog